A Few Words With The Dom

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Interviewed and Written by Al Bahmani

 

On and off stage Dom Irrera is a real likable character. With multiple stand up appearances from his break out performance on Rodney Dangerfield’s “Nothing Goes Right” to multiple appearances on the “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno”, “The Late Show With David Letterman”, two HBO One Night Stands, and voted Number 79 in “Comedy Central’s 100 Greatest Stand ups of All Time”, and a regular every year at the Just For Laughs Comedy Festival, Dom Irrera is a stand up force to reckoned with. Turn on the tv and you’ll see his face all over it, from films like “Hollywood Shuffle” and “The Big Lebowski” to roles in documentaries like “I Am Comic”, to “The Aristrocrats” to shows like “Seinfeld”, “Everybody Loves Raymond” to “King of Queens” to “Hey Arnold!” to “Bob’s Burgers” and many more. End of the day when all is said and done, Dom’s just a regular guy from Philly you’d share a pitcher beer with to help pass the time. We take some of that time and talk about the comedy business, his comic philosophy and what it takes to last so long in it.

 

I turn on the tv and your on it, what do you contribute your longevity in the business?

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Comedy Pro-Tip: How NOT to Ask a Booker For Work

Do NOT ask for work in the first contact you have with someone. Introduce yourself and ask how to submit. You’re human first, comic second.

Do NOT ask for work while congratulating someone. Then it just looks like you’re only congratulating them because you want work. And you’ve just erased your good will (and thensome).

Do NOT ask for work with a general “What do you book?” Take the time to know who you’re speaking to.

Do NOT ask for work with a giant BCCed email. Use a mail merge program like GroupMail Pro or Max Bulk Mailer so even if your emails aren’t personal, it looks like they are.

Do NOT ever lie about your draw or your resume. Anyone you’re asking for work has seen more comics than you have, and can see through it.

And Do NOT bring up a tragic event to strike up a conversation and then casually bring up work.

As always, the best way to get work is to concentrate on being a good human being.

Hugs,

Steve Hofstetter

http://www.stevehofstetter.com
Follow Steve on Twitter
Check out his YouTube channel

This was posted with the permission of Steve Hofstetter.

Come And Take It: Comedy Take Over! Q&A

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From one of the folks that brought you the Houston Whatever Festival! comes the Come And Take It Comedy Take Over!

I was curious so I called Andrew Youngblood of Warehouse Live and Youngblood Booking to get further details. It’s a start.

Al Bahmani

So What Is It? Are we reenacting Texas history with comedians?

Currently it’s a two day comedy festival. It will grow next year, ideally it will be four days. It’s a two day comedy festival from 4pm in the afternoon to one in the morning. in all three rooms in Warehouse Live! Each room is a different venue.

All Stand Up?

It’s not strictly all stand ups. There are going to be podcasts, potential movie interruptions, improvisation, and even some burlesque.

So who’s going to be on it?

Maria Bamford, Todd Barry, Kevin McDonald & many many more.

Wow! Those are some really big names. When can you announce them?

I can’t announce it until October 7th.

And what Houston Comics are on it?

As soon as I’m locking in larger talent first. I’ll start announcing the locals.

For more check out their

www.comeandtakeitcomedy.com

Like Them On Facebook

Follow Them On Twitter

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Notes On The Comedy Underground

By Paul Oddo
August 22nd, 2014 | New York City, NY
Edited by Al Bahmani

Open mics are like slaughterhouses. We all want the meat, but few of us have the guts to get down on that killing floor to witness the carnage and appreciate the process. Beautiful jokes are prime cuts of expertly carved funny meat. What ends up on your plate is the end result of a long gruesome undertaking, which is the practice required to hone the skill to make it look so easy. When people see Louis CK, Chris Rock, Sarah Silverman or Russell Peters perform they buy the ticket, enjoy the show and go home with those memories. They don’t see the failure that went into reaching that polished level. There is a lot of effort involved in making it look effortless, many levels to get there, and open mics are one of the most important.

To many people open mics are not seen as important. They can be excruciatingly awkward at times. Other times open mics downright offensive and even frightening. During our mic people have asked me questions;

“Is it always this misogynistic?”

“Is this mic supposed to be this offensive?”

“Do people make jokes about race a lot?”

“Do comics do a lot of homophobic material like that?”

“Why do you let people say things like that?”


My answer is always the same,

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The Etiquette of Bombing: A 5 step guide to recovery.

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By Billy D. Washington

Edited By Al Bahmani

It’s late Friday night and a comic hears a knock at his hotel room door. A half dressed cutie stands there and says, “I saw your show tonight and got so turned on that I want you to make love to me tonight!“. The comic asks, “Was it the early or the late show?“.

There is nothing a comic takes more personally than bombing. Most would rather be accused of a crime than to be exposed to the uncomfortable stares of entertainment inadequacy. You never see it coming. The Bomb assumes its position when you least expect it. There is no clue as to its arrival, no prep for its ire and certainly no remedy for its results. Pre-bomb symptoms often take on flu like qualities. They include a sudden hot flash, a tightening in your vocal area, watery eyes, confusion and that one bead of sweat that develops somewhere in the middle of your back and rolls precisely through ass crack center. No matter how physically comedic or rhetorically gifted you are nobody is outside of its realm of influence. Many years ago I performed at the HBO comedy festival in Aspen and watched George Carlin stop in the middle of a taping and opt to close a showcase show later that night because the audience just wasn’t there for him.
Somewhere over the Rainbow…. If George Carlin can bomb, why oh why can’t I.

There are many ways to handle the Bomb, but as a comic who has experienced it few times and witnessed it many, I wanted to offer a few options as to how to address the humiliation with your head held high.

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