Comedy Pro-tip: How to Know if You’re ACTUALLY a Local Draw

Many comedians pitch my clubs that they are local draws. If you are, you absolutely should not be pitching a club on being part of someone else’s show. You should be happy to take your own door, as you’d make WAY more money that way and continue to build your fan base.

Here’s the way my clubs handle local draws. The comic picks a Sunday where we don’t already have a show. They get 80% of the door. We will cover all taxes and credit card fees out of our 20%. If there are at least 50 people in attendance, comped or sold, we waive the $500 room rental fee. You can pitch that deal to almost any comedy club on an off-night and get a yes.

If you can’t draw, this is not a good deal for you. If you CAN draw, you walk away with over $2500 in one show. At bigger clubs, you could walk with $4K – in one show!

Because I can draw, I often book my own shows in rock venues, bars, etc – where I can keep up to 100% of the door. But I do not do this unless I’m sure I can sell out, or come close to it. If you over promise and under deliver, you’ll never have a show at that venue again.

If you are scared AT ALL as to whether or not you’d draw 50 people, you are NOT a draw. If you don’t want to assume some risk in exchange for 5-10 times the reward, you are NOT a draw.

Please be honest with yourself and with the club you’re pitching about whether or not you can draw. And if you can draw, always take a door deal – if they’re your customers, you should be the one getting the lion’s share of the ticket money.

When someone pitches us on how great their draw is but then don’t want a door deal, we immediately know that they’re not confident in that draw. So why should we be?

Hugs.

Steve Hofstetter

http://www.stevehofstetter.com
Follow Steve on Twitter
Check out his YouTube channel

This was posted with the permission of Steve Hofstetter.

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